Day: January 14, 2022

Global Health

Health Education Plan

You need to put your health first yet so many of us will leave our health at the bottom of the priority list, leaving it unattended until it gets to late and we fall into ill health.

We seem to take health for granted and that makes us feel invincible up to the point that our health fails and then we look at our health. This attitude is clearly wrong and it is up to you to take preventative action with your health and this will not only make you feel better and more energetic, you will also have your body literally thanking you and add years to your life.

The western culture, in particular the US and the UK are getting fatter and becoming overweight and obese. As a result of this more people are trying to slim down and lose some weight but the problem here is a

Read More
Blog article

COVID-19 pill rollout stymied by shortages as omicron rages

Craige Campbell, a website manager from Desert Hot Springs, California, began leaving messages with his doctor immediately after testing positive for COVID-19 and developing a 101-degree fever. Despite having no underlying health conditions, he was soon able to get a prescription.

The only pharmacy dispensing the drug was more than an hour’s drive away, so Campbell had a friend pick it up for him.

“I felt a bit privileged in a way,” he said. “The odds that it would land in my plate in the right amount of time were pretty extraordinary.”

At the same time, there is a shortage of antibody medications, the infused or injected drugs that can head off death and hospitalization. Only one of them, from GlaxoSmithKline, appears effective against omicron, and it, too, is being rationed.

Federal officials are limiting shipments of it to about 50,000 doses per week. This week, the government announced it

Read More
Health News

Does new study really show that hydroxychloroquine might be effective against omicron?

Credit: Stock Footage Inc/Shutterstock

Hydroxychloroquine, the anti-malaria drug controversially touted as a cure for COVID despite a lack of robust evidence, is creating renewed interest as a potential treatment for omicron.

The discussion has been sparked by a new study from the University of Glasgow, which is yet to be published in a scientific journal, that looks at how antibodies from vaccines block omicron from entering cells. The researchers conclude, as many others have, that antibodies (the proteins that neutralize the virus) against previous variants or induced by vaccines are less effective against omicron. What’s interesting, though, is that the study finds that omicron may have changed the way it enters cells.

SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID, is coated in a (a made of two layers) just like our cells. When the virus enters our cells, the bilayers fuse like oil droplets on the surface

Read More